Part 2

Research

Photo's with chewing gum

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HANNAH WILKE

This picture shows a series of glamorous photographs where the artist has put chewing gum on her body, accompanied with real chewing gum. I think having the real sculptures there helps put into context photos better because it is not necessarily clear to the viewer what the material is. She is posing topless and is playing with the idea of the nude and the gaze. The second bottom left reminds me a lot of a kind of perfume advert in a way which is interesting because I'm sure this is the message she intended to convey, but is still relevant 40 years on from being made. The title, "Starification" is a neologism that refers to a concept of creating a "star" or celebrity. (1)

This artist relates to my work because she to used chewing gum. I enjoyed using it because it is a malleable material and when mixed with flower creates a nice matt effect. Unlike the artist I am not intent on making the media clear, intact I enjoy the ambiguity it brings to my pieces. When people say "oh thats pretty" I find it amusing they don't really know "yeah it's been in my mouth and is covered in bacteria". I was interested to see why the artist chose to use the media and found her reasons were less to do with its properties and more to do with how people use it. "I chose gum because it's the perfect metaphor for the American woman - chew her up, get what you want out of her, throw her out and pop in a new piece." (1) This made me wonder how my piece my be perceived differently if I used other peoples gum, or even develop different meaning if I used left over gum. Don't they use scraping gum off the bottom of a table as a punishment sometimes? This made me think about researching the different punishments. That might be fun to collect..

(1) http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/wilke-marxism-and-art-beware-of-fascist-feminism-p79357/text-summary

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Annotated notes - Wilke gallery review

Peninsula, Kovats

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TANIA KOVATS

‘My main area of interest as an artist is with landscape. The landscapes that interest me the most are geolocially explicit landscapes where you can clearly read the narrative of formation or erosion. This leads me to be working with landscapes that are often remote – cliff edges, deserts, odd geological incidents." (2)

What interested me about this quote was the different processes that inspired her work. It seems for me a slight contradiction to have a static piece encompassing a kinetic process. The piece bellow however does have clear relation to the process of erosion, which seems apparent by the viewer being able to see the cracked off piece of 'the earth'. I find it funny how I can't help but see the piece as part of the earth, because the materials so clearly communicate and elude to a large mountain wall of some sort. What I really enjoy about the piece is the layers, it seems very authentically naturally formed. These become clearer in contrast to the cube which has been eroded. When writing this I automatically assumed the piece had crumbling bits coming off the sculpture, however when I look to see it doesn't, I am intrigued by the schema I have in my head having assumed there is some. I think this is because the piece captures movement extremely well.

"overtly geologically- themed works like Basalt (2004), Tilted (2002), Peninsula (1997) and the impressive Mountain (2001): a functioning machine used to demonstrate the effects of tectonic movement using lead shot, wax and a man-powered screw mechanism." (3)

I was interested by the need for human involvement in this piece, as it makes the piece kinetic. It also to me spoke of anthropogenic climate change.

(2) http://www.artandsciencejournal.com/post/26143194198/tania-kovats-these-sculptures-by-tania-kovats-draw

(3) http://artmag.saatchigallery.com/tania-kovats-oceans/ 

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Video on sculpture

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'Holm" Kovats

Some similarities I drew between this piece and my own was they are both very neutral colours, can both be read at a different scale to what they are (could imagine massive).
 
What interested me in this video was that the piece is made by being "cast in concrete" (4) whereas I read it as an iceberg of some sort, the white making me think it was light, in contrast to a heavy concrete piece.  I find it difficult to relate to her saying "Understand as a built thing even though its a natural thing" (4) because although I knew it was made by her, being built of concrete makes me feel it isn't a natural thing anymore. This phrase also made me start to think about the difference between what it means to build and what it means to make. 
 
Video screen shot also from this source
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Making or building

Tania Kovats

Kovats interview

What interested me about this was the way she wanted her work to encompass a feeling, or get the essence of a space: such as erosion or playing with the idea of time. Doing this instead of trying to recreate a particular site makes me see her work as interpretations of nature in a way, almost like how a painting has it's own logic and relative world. Unlike painting her sculptures occupy 3D and seem to be shaped all 360 degrees.

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Youtube Video - Natural Sculpture

Youtube Video

I linked this video because the final result reminds the of Kovat's work on the right. This is because they both have layers which appear to be very organic because they imitate (or in the YouTube videos case is cast from) natural forms. I find they are both successful however I think the piece created in the Youtube video appears to be more sci-fi like because it is shining and the material has more modern/ man-made connotations. Kovat's piece however is very similar to a Desert landscape.

This piece made me think about verticalness so I tried my blocks going up.

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ANIMALITY EXHIBITION

Robert Longo drawing of a tigers face, and sophisticated framing showed the tiger as regal and strong, the focus on the eyes gave a human portrait like feel to the piece, whereas in Malia Jenson's 'perfect circle' (imperfect) the cats were hard to recognise, she did this by making them dirty and having them interdependent with one another. She also had the piece on the floor which made the cats seem discarded and slightly disgusting, contrasting Longo's realistic Tiger drawing which idolised the animal by enlarging it.

Having only the tigers face meant the piece became more anthropomorphic than when one sees the animals full body, whereas it was easy to look at the cats in Jenson's piece as objects instead of representing an animal. 

For example, I discarded Longo's piece quickly because I assumed it was a photograph, not that I am against photography, but I have seen many photos depicting the face of a tiger and the pieces composition seemed oddly familiar for something I had never seen. Jenson's piece however captivated me because I was forced by the artist to crouch and look closely at the animals, and I kept walking around the piece trying to gage all it's dimensions. I had also never seen anything like it before. This exhibition has inspired me to research create something that forces a certain type of movement for the viewer, and consider further the importance of where in the room a work is located. The piece being on floor is something I really enjoyed and I may adapt in future works.

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Shibboleth, Scalcedo

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DORIS SALCEDO

In particular, Salcedo is addressing a long legacy of racism and colonialism that underlies the modern world. A ‘shibboleth’ is a custom, phrase or use of language that acts as a test of belonging to a particular social group or class. By definition, it is used to exclude those deemed unsuitable to join this group.

‘The history of racism’, Salcedo writes, ‘runs parallel to the history of modernity, and is its untold dark side’. For hundreds of years, Western ideas of progress and prosperity have been underpinned by colonial exploitation and the withdrawal of basic rights from others. Our own time, Salcedo is keen to remind us, remains defined by the existence of a huge socially excluded underclass, in Western as well as post-colonial societies.

In breaking open the floor of the museum, Salcedo is exposing a fracture in modernity itself. Her work encourages us to confront uncomfortable truths about our history and about ourselves with absolute candidness, and without self-deception. (5)

When I saw this work none of this came to me don't think successful in that way, I still don't. When I originally saw it, which was exhibited in 2007 so I would have been 9, but still remember seeing work. Remember getting down on knees and being surprised by how deep it was and walking along it with one food on either side. Now when I see images of the piece I still feel it fails to communicate the message it states above. This however to me does not make it an unsuccessful piece, infact I find it highly successful. I didn't realise how superficial the crack was when I visited. Now I can see that it is made to purposely look like two pieces of a puzzle that would fit together perfectly, like my graphs. 

The concrete block casts of the art work cost £23,410 to ship across South America and then the Atlantic Ocean in four 40ft containers. 

The work has caused controversy among the public as it appears to just be a crack in the ground - supposedly resembling an earthquake fissure.

Charles Thomson, of the Stuckists, an anti-modern art group, said the work was "typically self-deluded and pretentious" of the art world, who are far removed from reality in their ivory tower.

He said: "It's a ridiculous amount of money to spend on what is essentially a novelty that will be of no interest in the future.(6)

Researching peoples perceptions of the piece gave me the impression I was not the only person who failed to see the comment on society. The red text made me laugh because it's true it is a crack in the ground, and that's all, but that's what makes it appealing to me. The process of cracking something has large connotations with breaking, it is almost like a massive scar down the hall. To purposely break, or in some ways destroy, becoming something that I find visually appealing (almost decoration) is almost a contradiction. If there was a massive crack down a wall in my house it wouldn't be taken as art, but the context and the space makes the piece art. Salcedo has almost struck the Turbine hall and is playing with its space.

(5http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/unilever-series-doris-salcedo-shibboleth

(6) http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-517989/Revealed-How-Tate-Moderns-crack-ground-cost-taxpayers-23-000.html#ixzz4PAmbZEAv 

 

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Kate MccGwire (8)

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Kate MccGwire (8)

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Kate MccGuire

Kate MccGwire is an internationally renowned British sculptor whose practice probes the beauty inherent in duality, employing natural materials to explore the play of opposites at an aesthetic, intellectual and visceral level. Growing up on the Norfolk Broads her connection with nature and fascination with birds was nurtured from an early age, with avian subjects and materials a recurring theme in her artwork. Since graduating from the Royal College of Art in 2004 her uncanny sculptures have been exhibited at the Saatchi Gallery (London), the Museum of Art and Design (New York), Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature (Paris) and recently at Glasstress, an official collateral event of the Venice Biennale. (7)

I found MccGuire's work at first glance extremely beautiful and it was not a suprise to me to see she is well exhibited. What interested me about the amount of places she has exhibited was if she installs pieces fitting the unique space of some galleries and with some further research found:

"What’s Next? 
It’s going to be a busy few months ahead, March is a new installation in the Tatton Park Biennial, Cheshire. Then a large scale feather installation at the Museum of Art and Design in New York, in April" (11)

This shows she does tend to create site specific work. An example of this can be seen on the left, which is small and comes out from one of the buildings pipes. Although I like this piece, I significantly prefer the installation at 2:46 in the YouTube video (12) to the left, which fills the room. I think it is more successful because the feathers going onto the floor are more controlled and thick whereas the sparse feathers on the floor from the pictured installation lose the beauty of the natural bird like organised feathers on the curved form.

I try and create works which are bodily, that have some sort of visceral, immediate feeling about them. A reference again to the notion of the uncanny, both relating to the organic body and yet alien and strange. The pieces in the cabinets for instance are trapped, they have no head to them, they are uncomfortable and beautiful at the same time, we recognise creases and crevices and they refer back to ourselves but they are otherworldly. I’m constantly trying to construct this fine line between attractive and vaguely disquieting. (9)

The cabinet pieces are undoubtedly trapped, it is the first word that came to mind when I saw images of these sculptures. I find some more than others, for example in the two cabinet pieces bellow (right) I feel more sorry for the large white one than the smaller one.  This could be to do with scale, however one would normally find smaller things 'cuter', but there is an element of so big its cute. Although it is an obscure reference, this reminds me of Baymax (see source 10) from Big Hero 6 a Disney film. I think the idea of something being so big its personified and becomes cuter would be something I would like to explore. A large impact on the reason the viewer may sympathise with the art works, or anthropomorphise them is because of the colour. White is often seen as pure, clean, innosent and it is possible this contributes to the anthropomorphising of the sculptures, so I could use the colour to try and promote this idea. Another parallel I draw between the two that interests me is how easy it is to interpret both of the things as living creatures. Obviously Baymax is based on the human form however it is pushed to such an extreme it is mainly just two black dots that make us read him as a HIM. MccGuire's piece on the other hand is interpreted as a being because of the material.

Both pieces in the cabinets pictured are feathured so I don't believe this is why I sympathise and prefer the larger piece. I think the colour makes it easier to read the larger one as Pigion feathers, compared to the crow feathers where it is easier to ditatch the material from the sculpture and focus on form without feeling sympathy. Something that interested me about the interview was that the smaller right sculpture 'Gag' was her favorite cabinate piece.

I find the larger sculpture to almost have a narritive, prehaps because I have been looking at it for too long, but the cabinet on the top's decoration reminds me of a gate to medevil prisions and I see the sculpture as a prisioner curled up into themselves. 'Gag' on the other hand reminds me more of a museam exhibition. Having analysed her work more I feel I understand what she meant by people bringing their experiences when observing the piece more.

I feel I've changed my mind and I now prefer the cabinate pieces because it interests me greatly how much I have managed to convinve myself the sculpture inside is a living breathing thing with feelings.

(7) http://katemccgwire.com/about/

(8) Both pictures sourced from http://braided-stream.blogspot.co.uk/2011/09/kate-mcguire.html?m=1

(9) http://www.cvltnation.com/wrest-writhe-cvlt-nation-interviews-kate-mccgwire/

(10) http://cdn.collider.com/wp-content/uploads/big-hero-6-baymax-hiro-hug.jpg

(11) http://www.saatchigallery.com/artists/kate_mccgwire_articles.htm

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Baymax, Big Hero 6 (10)

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Kate MccGwire Interview (11)

Interview with McGwire

"Chose titles with immediate associations"


"Cabinet ones are all trapped/don't have heads"


"Creates through making"

(11) https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Cwc_BYZraRY

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Where does one thing end and the next begin? (12)

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Where does one thing end and the next begin?

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Where does one thing end and the next begin?

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Where does one thing end and the other begin?

This text made me think about colliding things, and the confusion it creates for the viewer. I like this idea of the contrast between two things - a way I could incorporate this in my work could be by using complimentary colours or placing things in contrasting environments. This has inspired me to photograph my green enlarged 'gum' piece - which is very artificial and scifiesk looking - in natural spaces like emerging from leaves.

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Alison Lowry Glass Work - own photo

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ALISON LOWRY

'Pate de verre vessels with silver leaf and knitted silver wire on Bangor slate base' Label of piece

I really liked this piece, it reminded me of the remains of foam left in the bottom of my mixing bowls which solidify to take the shape of the container. This piece made me think about presenting them because they are something I really enjoy. I find the way they vary depending on the surface they were mixed really interesting. I really enjoy title of this piece "Silver linings" because for me the left overs in the mixing bowl are a silver lining - in a metaphorical sense- to destroying the bowl (technicians suggest I dispose of after so other students don't mix products in them which will react). For this work I think its extremely successful because of the play on words - they are linings of cup shaped things - and they are made with silver wire.

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Lynda Benglis (13)

Lynda Benglis (16)

LYNDA BENGLIS

I chose to research Lynda Benglis because of the similarities between our medias, however as I researched became surprised by similarities in our practise. For example she speaks about "not depicting something"(13) which I interpret as not trying to replicate an existing recognisable object, something I find a common theme through lots of my work. Her work also seems to explore how to interact with space, so I would hope to see one of her exhibitions in my life time.

In interview (13) Benglis states her pieces are "About nature and mankind about feelings" (13) which interested me because many of her materials are not natural, however they do embody an idea of growth and movement which is something I also get from MccGwire's work.

 Benglis stating her work was "reacting to materials of pop art, and ideas of minimalist. not interested in taking art to final minimal conclusion." (13) made me intrigued to research her work in relation to the time she was working in. (See POSTMINIMALISM book). I did however gather she was not a minimalist because she "wanted art to be more accusative, about more not less." (13). She stated "form and texture create mood and magic of work" (13) which is something I am excited to see happen with my end results.

In my research I discovered this article titled "The women who refused to take her clothes off for Warhol" (14) which I thought would give me a greater insight into how she worked, however was extremely disappointed by the articles lack of insight into her practise. Instead the article taught me more about her life, and went into detail about her nude statement advertisement piece; which I was already familiar from my research into Hannah Wilke. Her statement on her use of the "gaze" (14) made me think I couldn't appreciate this piece because it is not new to me. I imagine the impact would be a lot higher at the time of publishing because female empowerment was less seen during the time of creation.

"Benglis’ concern with making soft things hard while preserving their insouciant memories of softness may or may not have something to do with feminism, phallicism, and other politico-sensualities. She is more concerned, I think, with the Romantic concept of the artist as a force of Nature. Nature can change states – freeze water, melt rocks; Benglis, too, can congeal or liquefy matter – and in the process make sculpture as calculated, precise, and refined as icicles (quoted in press release for ‘Bettina Rheims/Lynda Benglis’, Cheim & Read, New York 2002, http://www.cheimread.com/exhibitions/2002_10_bettina-rheims--lynda-benglis/?view=pressrelease)." (15)

What interests me about this quote is..

"Lynda Benglis is perhaps best-known for the full-colour advertisement she placed in Artforum magazine in 1974, consisting of a nude photograph of herself posing with a large latex dildo. A reaction to the phallocentrism of the contemporary art world, it certainly caused a stir.
Her oeuvre, however, is much wider than merely overt feminist gestures, as visitors to this enthralling 50-work survey show at the Hepworth Wakefield – the first to take place in a UK institution – will discover. 
Describing her 3D sculptural pieces as paintings that have escaped from the frame of the canvas, Benglis was heralded in the 60s as the “heir to Pollock”, when she began creating her so-called Fallen Paintings, pouring liquid plastic on to the floor and against the walls. She is a lover of a wide range of materials – bronze, polyurethane, glitter, paper and film, to name but a few – and she has studios across the globe in New York, New Mexico, Greece and India. 
Throughout her career, Benglis has made a concerted effort to push against any definition and to resist categorisation. “I think artists create their own rules,” she says. “Or break them.”" (16)

The process is a manipulation of the materials that are drawings, I draw in space, with the materials (16)

 
I want to see an image that expresses the material quality or materialness of whatever it is (16)

  

Does it start from the material or the idea? Chicken and the egg (16)

 

I like to invent new forms (16)

  

(Added 29/11/19)

I returned to (14) article to research a gallery I didn't know. I discovered the Hepworth Wakefield Gallery and found the artist Anthea Hamilton on their website, whose "Volcano Table" (17) I felt related to my project. A parallel I drew between Bengalis and Hamilton was the use of blobs, however I felt there were larger distinguishing differences. Firstly, Hamilton's piece was easier to describe than Benglis's work because of the use of everyday objects. The piece is aided by the title which reinforces the exploding idea; the piece could be described as a table with shiny red blobs exploding from it, with a clear retro telephone on the table. Obviously this does not do masses of justice to the piece, however it is easier to describe than Benglis's pieces such as 'Quatered Meteor'. Overall her work is quite ineffable because of it's formless (or reduction of recognisable form) nature. Secondly the use of materials to make blobs had very different impacts, Hamilton's piece has a lighter more comic effect because of the shine (which material I could not find whilst researching, but I expect is fibreglass) whereas Benglis' has much more of a raw natural feel where the material seems to do its own thing in a way. 

(13) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33Fay9DOzZM

(14) http://images.cheimread.com/www_cheimread_com/Times_2_3_15.pdf

(15) http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/benglis-quartered-meteor-t13353/text-summary

(16) https://vimeo.com/119684066

(17) https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/fall-2016-preview-20-museum-shows-europe-612092

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Antha Hamilton (17)

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ANTHA HAMILTON

What I think of the piece - illustrative, playful, looks full of energy, has large amount of movement, even without title easy to read as a quick explosion - explosion of colour to. Notice table still usable, not like Chair filled with fat we saw today which

In an interview when talking about the piece above Hamilton said it was "Made as an image from my archive, the table is made for someone to do their phone calls from" (18) I found this funny because I had totally overlooked the telephone, which I can now see as quite a significant object. The telephone makes reference to artists beyond the exhibition, one which sticks out to me is the 'Lobster Telephone' (19). For Dali the use of the telephone was important because "telephones had strong sexual connotations for him, and he drew a close analogy between food and sex" (20). For me telephones have connotations surrounding communication - how do we communicate? Is it effective? Something this piece evokes for me is the direction of communication. If I see the red blobs as all the information we are putting through the telephone, into the world, we don't get any back. I think the piece would appear quite aggressive if all the blobs diffracted into the viewer. This has made me think about creating a dome fit for one with yellow blobs coming from all angles towards you, looking like they might drip onto you, with a chair you can't sit on in the centre. 

I found this description of the exhibition interesting because I found the idea of re-appropriating objects would be changing the purpose, which I question the extent this has happened. She "has re-appropriated objects from the collection, using unexpected details as starting points for new works." (18) for me she has responded to objects from the collection, not changed their purpose. She has created a completely new piece of work which serves a new purpose, as such she has not changed the purpose of the piece she was inspired. I see this work as a conversation with the previous object, because it is made as a response to the other. I find the most obvious example of this is the Christopher Wood kimono she has created using the same pattern as a jumper worn by a character in his painting. 

(18) http://www.hepworthwakefield.org/antheahamilton/

(19) http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/dali-lobster-telephone-t03257

(20) http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/dali-lobster-telephone-t03257/text-display-caption

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Lobster Phone (19)

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BENGLIS WORK DESCRIPTION

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BENGLIS WORK DESCRIPTION

This description made me think about the permanence of my work and the materials I use, something I had not previously thought about. In future I will be more considerate of this.

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LYNDA BENGLIS REVIEWS

I was interested to see how people and other critics had attempted to describe Benglis's pieces, and have decided to assess how well I felt they explain her work. These are taken from reviews of her exhibition at the Hepworth Wakefield Gallery.

"Benglis’s sculptures drool and slump. They flex, they tie themselves in knots and fly across the walls. They are full of variety and contradiction. Benglis is great at inchoate mute lumps and just as good with delicacy, the decorative and highly crafted...... Her work can be sexy and funny, gorgeous and faecal...." (21)

I found this description surprisingly accurate I feel it captured the contradictions that presented in her work well and does not attempt to understand the pieces instead the writer appreciates the complex ineffability of the work. I believe the way she describes the sculptures as if they are living and have personalities works extremely well because it gives a larger impression of the movement and excitement in her pieces. It also fits with Benglis's approach to materials because she allows them to behave in their own way.

"In many ways these objects are not straightforward sculptures, their materials are odd; plastic, glitter and wax; their surfaces rough and uneven and forms range from the looming large-scale of ‘The Graces‘ (2003/05) to the narrow reliefs of ‘Grey‘ (1971)." (22) 

Compared to the last description, this description seemed less capable of capturing the excitement of the pieces however I found the need for the writer to reference images of works interesting because it illustrates the complexity of the pieces, such as their heaping and oozing.

(21) https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/feb/05/lynda-benglis-review-good-dirty-fun

(22) http://www.corridor8.co.uk/online/review-lynda-benglis-the-hepworth-wakefield/

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POST MINIMALISM by Robert Pincus-Witten

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POST MINIMALISM by Robert Pincus-Witten

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POST MINIMALISM by Robert Pincus-Witten

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POST MINIMALISM by Robert Pincus-Witten

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ART SINCE 1960S - Michael Archer

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ART SINCE 1960S - Michael Archer

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Robert Lobe (23)

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ROBERT LOBE

When looking for Benglis work in a book about the exhibition "Anti Illusion: Procedures/Materials", Whitney Musem of American Art, New York I discovered this artists work. It was his early work that particularly intrigued me because of his use of string which reminded me of mops. His recent work has a larger focus on nature. This is seen by the use of found objects like trees and leaves. (24) Listening to an interview with him (25), I learnt a technique called repousse - hammering into the reverse of something. 

(23) http://www.robertlobe.com/sculpture/early_work/

(24) http://www.robertlobe.com/sculpture/wall_sculpture3/

(25) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHLGtbvaINY

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ANSELM KIEFER

This piece, exhibited in the White Cube, gave me the idea of creating a large drip of foam with similar compositional. Almost like a large foam waterfall. I enjoyed the thinness of this piece which made me wonder about creating a large sheet of foam on a dirty matt, which when removed would have traces of the mat, as I particularly enjoyed the traces left on the back of the toilet blob I made. I also liked the traces left in the clothes that had been dipped in plaster, where the material completely changed the flow and feel of the items.

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Kiefer exhibition own photo

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Kiefer own photo

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CHANGING MATERIAL

The piece bellow by Kiefer made me think about changing the material of the mops heads I had - ideas that came to mind were dipping them in plater like he had or concrete. Unfortunately speaking to Cat it seemed the material was too complicated and the concrete would likely be too fragile. Seeing Izzy Harvey's work where she sprayed the sponge with stone spray made me consider doing this to the mops as a practical alternative - however it would be quite expensive.

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Kiefer own photo - material change

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FRANZ WEST

FRANZ WEST

"The idea was more to create an environment, and that the Adaptive could be handled and used rather than be looked at. For the romantics the Schlegel and the German philosophers, what makes art and painting special is that neither should be touched. With the Adaptives, the opposite is true." —Franz West (26)

I like the idea of breaking the 4th wall and allowing the viewer to touch and have fun with the pieces of work. This is something I intend to adapt with my leg wedge, rather than just presenting photos I will present the object so people can participate, like in West's work. I find the Passtucke themselves really interesting objects, this is something I will consider when making the wedge. I like how the pieces work exhibited in a white space as well as when interacted with, and hope the object I make will be interesting isolated as well as when interacted with. Seeing the video contained more coloured pieces I thought about making the wedge bright and colourful, however due to the placement on the body I feel this would be making a nod to 1980s parachute pants which is a link I don't want to create. I don't see the piece as an item of clothing, I consider it more of a frame or cast to try and get the body to pose in a certain way - this action where the viewer is forced to become the sculpture is something I find fun.

(26) https://www.artsy.net/artwork/franz-west-passstuck-adaptive

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Ingeborg Luscher own photo

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ABOVE WORK

I walked past this exhibition by accident and could not help notice the uncanny similarities between this work and the Polythurane foam I have been using. Seeing the plain yellow in a gallery context reinforced my desire to keep the material raw but also encouraged me to research colour associations further.

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Goo/ooz/putty (27)

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Goo/ooz/putty (27)

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GOO/OOZ/PUTTY

Seeing these images made me think that creating a large blob of polythurane foam was to some extent too predictable a result, which puts me off spending a lot of money and material on it. Obviously it would not be the same as any of these pieces but I feel looking at these images has satisfied my desire to create a large blob because the most interesting thing about these pieces for me is the materials - like Benglis casting the form in lead - which isn't something I would be able to do in the time remaining for this project.

(27) http://radicalart.info/informe/Viscosity/index.html

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COLOUR ASSOCIATIONS

WHITE

Jungian light spirituality holy

Purity, cleanness

Dyslexics told to "Avoid white backgrounds for paper, computer and visual aids. White can appear too dazzling." () 

Possible increase in anthropomorphising (see Kate MccGwire)

  • White Christmas: the appearance of snow on Christmas day
  • White elephant: a possession that no longer holds value for its owner See why…
  • White flag: the signal of a peaceful surrender
  • White goods: a description of household items, such as linens, towels, and appliances
  • White hot: extreme manner of intensity
  • White lie: a harmless untruth usually told out of politeness Why white instead of another color?
  • White feather: a symbol of cowardice ()

() http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/common/ckeditor/filemanager/userfiles/About_Us/policies/Dyslexia_Style_Guide.pdf

() http://www.sensationalcolor.com/color-meaning/color-meaning-symbolism-psychology/all-about-the-color-white-4369#.WE6xyXecbq0

GREY

"Grey is the color of intellect, knowledge, and wisdom. It is perceived as long-lasting, classic, and often as sleek or refined. It is a color that is dignified, conservative, and carries authority.

Grey is controlled and inconspicuous and is considered a color of compromise, perhaps because it sits between the extremes of black and white. Gray is a perfect neutral, which is why designers often use it as a background color.

HOW THE COLOR GRAY AFFECTS US PHYSICALLY

  • Unsettles
  • Creates expectations" ()

Found the physical effects interesting because Kiefers exhibition made me feel unsettled and used a lot of grey. 

() http://www.sensationalcolor.com/color-meaning/color-meaning-symbolism-psychology/all-about-the-color-gray-4378#.WE6ylHecbq0

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CHARLES WILLIAMS

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CHARLES WILLIAMS

I was reminded of this piece when I read the hand foam drop photos I had taken as figures. I came across this piece initially when I was researching Stuckism (for leisure). The proportions of the head and neck seem to relate to my work as the drop of foam seem similar. Although I was already intending to create 3D versions of these images, this work has made me consider painting the pieces.

photo source () http://www.charleswilliamsartist.com

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JOAN HUGO TEXT

Browse: Home / Georges Bataille: “L’informe” (“Formless”) 1929

Georges Bataille: “L’informe” (“Formless”) 1929

A dictionary begins when it no longer gives the meaning of words, but their tasks. Thus formless is not only an adjective having a given meaning, but a term that serves to bring things down in the world, generally requiring that each thing have its form. What it designates has no rights in any sense and gets itself squashed everywhere, like a spider or an earthworm. In fact, for academic men to be happy, the universe would have to take shape. All of philosophy has no other goal: it is a matter of giving a frock coat to what is, a mathematical frock coat. On the other hand, affirming that the universe resembles nothing and is only formless amounts to saying that the universe is something like a spider or spit.

? “Formless” by Georges Bataille, Documents 1, Paris, 1929, p. 382 (translated by Allan Stoekl with Carl R. Lovitt and Donald M. Leslie Jr., Georges Bataille. Vision of

Excess. Selected Writings, 1927-1939, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press “Formless”, p. 31)....

......According to Bataille, ‘formless is not only an adjective... but a term serving to render déclassé the requirement that each thing have its own form... Actually, for academics to be happy would require the universe to take shape. All of philosophy has no other goal... On the other hand, to say that the universe resembles nothing and is nothing but formless is the same as saying that the universe is like a spider or a blob of spit [crachat]’.

Bois insists that the curatorial purpose was not to define l’informe (although the catalogue belies that claim), but to ‘deal modernism’s cards a new hand... so that certain works can never be read as before’.

To that end, they have elaborated four categories as vantage points from which to reconsider work made by very different artists over a span of some 60 years from the 30s through to the 80s. But, in the spirit of formlessness, the show’s structure is not chronological. This yields a cross-generational exhibition that allows artists to appear in more than one category, suggesting unexpected affinities.

Each section is intended to subvert or contradict a given of Modernism and the primacy of pure vision. Thus the first category, ‘Horizontality’, in which gravity is implicit, is posited against verticality, with its assumption of an erect viewer whose perceptual apparatus depends on a cone of vision. ‘Base Materialism’ is based on Bataille’s scatological notions of ‘the science of filth’ or ‘that which is other’, and works to undermine traditional materials and hierarchies. ‘Pulsation’, suggesting time, movement and repetition, rejects the totalising of abstraction and suggests libido versus cognitive unity. The final category, ‘Entropy’, countermands abstraction’s claim of imposing order over chaos and transcending material reality, and collapses the figure/ground distinction.

‘Horizontality’ is the most straightforward: it opened with Duchamp’s Three Standard Stoppages (1913-64) and ended with a large Mike Kelly Afghan carpet, The Riddle of the Sphinx (1971), encompassing works from a Jackson Pollock to Andy Warhol’s Dance Diagram (1962), and Oldenburg’s Sculpture in the Form of a Fried Egg (1966) to Eva Hesse’s Seven Poles (1970), which can be read as collapsing onto or rising from the floor. ‘Pulsation’ began again with Duchamp - this time his Rotoreliefs - leading to film and video by Bruce Nauman and Paul Sharit’s destabilising various aspects of perception, as well as kinetic works such as David Medalla’s Bubble Machine (1963-94) and Pol Bury’s 2270 Points Blanc (1965). ‘Base Materialism’ included the widest range of artists: from disquieting photographs by Wols, Picasso collages, and paintings by Lucio Fontana, Jean Fautrier and Jean Dubuffet, to Warhol’s Oxidation Painting (1978), Robert Rauschenburg’s Dirt Painting (1953) and Cindy Sherman’s large back-lit photographs of her face covered with a variety of unnameable materials. The range of ‘Entropy’ was equally large, spanning torn papers by Hans Arp and accumulations by Arman, to the documentation of a Smithson pour piece, Gordon Matta-Clark’s Threshole (1972-3) and Alan McCollum’s Natural Copies From the Coal Mines of Central Utah (1994-5), large, garishly coloured casts of dinosaur footprints found in the ceilings of mines.

Those familiar with the work of Bois and Krauss will not be surprised to find their arguments closely reasoned, densely historical and infuriatingly polemical. On the other hand, they do give us something solid to crunch on, as opposed to the recent spate of ill-considered ensembles brimming with unfocused opportunism and vapid eclecticism. But Bois and Krauss have set up very strict parameters whose rigidity and inflexibility result in inevitable exclusions. Although the catalogue essays give reasons for some of these omissions, they seem arbitrary; one suspects the curators have other agendas.

Joseph Beuys, for example, although discussed in the catalogue, is rejected as his work was deemed to be contaminated with idealism and too Utopian in its striving for transcendence. Likewise, Piero Manzoni’s ‘Achrome’ series is included in the ‘Base Materialism’ section, but his Merda d’artista (1962) is not because it might suggest a ‘fetishisation of excrement which is foreign to Bataille’s thought’; this is despite Bois’ assertion that ‘the notion of the foreign (heterogeneous) body allows the marking of the subjective, elementary identity of excrement (sperm, menses, urine, and faecal matter) and of all that has been regarded as sacred, divine or marvellous’. More disturbingly, and despite the clarity of Bataille’s statements, Feminist work is almost completely avoided. Indeed, there are only four women in the show (Eva Hesse, Yayoi Kusama, Lygia Clark and Cindy Sherman) and work about the body and its fluids is summarily excluded. No Hannah Wilke chewing gum pieces, no Judy Chicago Menstruation Bathroom (1972), no Carolee Schneeman Meat Joy (1964), no Kiki Smith. Krauss reads Sherman’s work through a Freud-Lacanian filter, dwelling at length on penis envy, castration anxiety, woman-as-fetish and the great Wound. Theory- driven to this extent, the exhibition functions ultimately as an illustration to the ideas elucidated in the texts, and this approach begins to assume the same kind of totalising narrowness for which Greenberg is reproached.

Leaving the exhibition, I noticed one of the urban nomads who camp out in front of the Pompidou and use its toilets. As she stepped onto the escalator she hooked a well-aimed, amorphous crachat against a concrete pillar, where it entropically began to obey the laws of gravity, blurring the boundaries between the horizontal and the vertical. The following day I happened upon her again in the Forum des Halles. She was sitting in a corner, crooning softly to herself while stroking her forearm with a toothbrush. Bataille would have been proud of her.

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USING LADDERS

http://www.midlandladders.com/blog/ladders/art-and-ladders-sculpture-and-form-part-1

"Although they are a practical item, their simple form and shapes, as well as the symbolism associated with ladders (regarding ascending and descending) have become a source of artistic inspiration and expression."

"“A ladder is a tool, a human creation, mimicking things we see in nature. It is steps into territories beyond our natural reach. A ladder has a physical reach, but from very early on it has occupied the human mind as a dream and a metaphor. As such, it has no limits, no scale and no physical explanation. "

Rising up

 

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RICHARD DEACON

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RICHARD DEACON - WHERE IDEAS COME FROM

This book shows and the models and machetes Deacon has used to develop his large scale works. Often incredibly intricate and precise as a means of working out the logistics of the pieces. What I also enjoy about this book is that is doesn't differentiate between the process of making and the resolved pieces of work, both seen as pieces of art. Model making is something I have never used before and this book has inspired me to use this as means of helping develop my ideas for my next project.

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IRVING PENN

"lends the icy blocks of fruits and vegetables a certain elegance you'd never imagine they'd have." () http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/10/fashion-photographer-irving-penn-dies-at-92-frozen-food-still-life.html

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TAR BABIES OF THE NEW WORLD ORDER - ROBERT MORRIS

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TAR BABIES OF THE NEW WORLD ORDER - ROBERT MORRIS

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TAR BABIES OF THE NEW WORLD ORDER - ROBERT MORRIS

I found this text less informative about the construction of the piece (pictured above) however it gave an amusing description and narrative behind the idea of a 'tar baby' and their characteristics. The idea of neither being exactly the same interested me and made me think about how suspeshion helps this - as they slowly move in different directions. As I was seeing an image not the real piece, this is something I hadn't thought about and was added by the text.  Suspension is also seems to be used in this piece as a way of making the objects missable, as suggested by the text the 'tar babies' are not always seen. The floating look also plays on references to cherubs and angels. In some ways I find this reference adds to the piece because often you see gold angels used to decorate churches and kitch houses, making me understand this piece as a critique of these ideas.Another thing I learnt from the book was that the babies themselves were cast and then painted, and highy fragile,whereas the pictures in some way give off a plastic feel. They are also significantly larger than any toy baby, so seem dominating. This piece has made me think about religious symbolism I know that I could use to help inform my work. For example to represent sharing the room I could refer back to Jesus sharing 5 loaves of bread and 2 fish.

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CATHOLIC CHURCH

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CATHOLIC CHURCH CEILING

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PRIMARY RESEARCH

These images made me draw further parallels between  Morris' Tar Babies piece and in Catholicism. Firstly as seen in the image above the use of a grid, in a church to differentiate between the stories, in Morris's piece possibly to manipulate the viewer into a certain passage or to give some order to the chaotic seeming tar babies (scary unpredictable weird descriptions from text). Secondly the high ceilings of the exhibition space for Morris' piece seems to mirror those of churches. This made me think about the idea of Art as a secular place of shared beauty and awe, replacing in some ways the role of the holy building.

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JUDITH BARRY

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External media

ROBERT MORRIS OBJECT SCULPTURE 1960-1965

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REBECCA STEWART ()

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REBECCA STEWART

When researching Glasgow's current student work I came across a piece made with a see through tent. I really liked the use the temporary nature of a tent as a shelter and the juxtaposition between what would be considered a very private space and the see through material used to create it which, I think, makes the work essentially a tool the expose rather than to shelter or protect. In my own work this made me consider the necessities of privacy in a 'room' - something which separates the outside from the inside and functions as a way of separating our private and our public personas. By removing the walls - or in the case of this work by removing the partial, if not the main, function of a wall without removing it physically, do we deprive a room of it's main function and thus it's status as a room? This made me think about how to explore whether you can reduce the room - by removing it's walls - physically still keep it's 'roomness'. I was also interested in the idea of presenting a photograph rather than an object in itself.

()https://www.flickr.com/photos/glasgowschoolart/17529098261/in/album-72157649614810593/

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TRACY EMIN

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Lydia Clark 1966 - 68

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Song Dong, Waste Not, 2005.

A poignant meditation on family life and the artist’s own childhood during the Cultural Revolution, the installation comprises over 10,000 items collected by Song Dong’s mother, Zhao Xiangyuan, over five decades - ranging from a section of the family home, to metal pots and plastic bowls to blankets, bottle caps, toothpaste tubes and toys. The activity of saving and re-using things is in keeping with the Chinese adage wu jin qi yong – ‘waste not’ – a prerequisite for survival during periods of social and political turmoil. Each time Song Dong remakes the work, assisted by his sister, Song Hui, and his wife Yin Xiuzhen, the entire family is brought together again. Memories are rekindled and personal family objects are rediscovered, bringing powerful emotions to the fore. Ultimately, Waste Not speaks of the strong bonds between family members and the power of objects to tell stories and shape our lives.

http://www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery/event-detail.asp?ID=12878 

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SERKAN OZKAYA

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FILM JUNO - screenshot

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JUNO

Furniture alone, is it possible to read as a room? Made me decide arrangement of furniture must be in open space. 

Source of image

() https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zL5ERWLi_lY

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CHRISTINA IGLASIAS

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CHRISTINA IGLASIAS

This piece inspired me by making me think about how I could use the light in the room to make my piece more impactful. I enjoy the subtlety of her change in the room. This made me think about making something missable, or adding an element to the work that is less clear to the viewer. Perhaps adding a time based element to the work. The most influential thing about this piece is it has made me consider where I should place my work in relation to the rooms light.

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STAINED WITH A PALE LIGHT - ADRIAN SEARLE

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STAINED WITH A PALE LIGHT - ADRIAN SEARLE

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STAINED WITH A PALE LIGHT - ADRIAN SEARLE

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SETH PRICE

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KARLA BLACK

https://frieze.com/article/karla-black-0?language=de

https://frieze.com/article/karla-black

"Once Karla Blacks work is installed is not supposed to change, we know this because the works aren’t allowed to be physically interact with. This is because the materials are fragile and if the works were interacted with they would change. At a fist look at Black’s work the most obvious evidence for an appreciation of a materials character is in the processes witch she uses to make the work because the results of the process are clearly visible and dictate the form of the work. For example Black rips plastic and leave the ripped sides on display, she also leave the plastic in the form witch is rip up in, all bunch to gather. Part of this appreciation for materials is conveyed to the viewer though the viewer them self’s, because the materials she uses are domestic the viewer has had a lot of experience with Blacks marital and hence can appriate how black treats the materials as they them self-have probably processed that material in that way.

The work of Karla back comments on the ability for a martial to change by using materials witch can easily change and preventing them form doing so. By doing this she gives the marital a potential to change and work becomes partially about how the material would like to behave. This is because the viewer know how the matieal wants to act through their own experience with it and so see’s the work talking about the behaviour of the materials as this is what then experience when looking at the work." ()

() http://tkowalski1.workflow.arts.ac.uk/research-file

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Karla Black

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This made me think about a physical response - if enclosed by the plastic this is heightened and you feel surrounded / barrier / possibly supressed

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Karla Black

Video Above

Made me think about how I wanted to present my piece - as a sculpture or as performance

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Karla Black

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Rachel Harrison, Nose (and detail), 2005, Wood, polystyrene, cement, acrylic, rubber, cardboard, 193 x 76.2 x 45.7 cm

Rachel Harrison’s work draws from a wide range of influence, wittily combining art historical and pop cultural references through a diverse play of materials. In Nose, Harrison’s figure towers on a cardboard box plinth as an abject gargoyle, adorned with a plastic joke shop nose. Grotesque and funny, Harrison’s humour derives from its carefully structured, yet open-ended suggestion, each element building up to a plausible punch line. Using visual language as a subversive tool, Harrison parodies expected comparison to artists such as Franz West and Paul McCarthy, appropriating styles and motifs with subtle knowingness, wielding artistic process as a mode of investigation. http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/rachel_harrison.htm 

Interested in how works become characters with association of one item e.g.. fake nose / wigs etc. Made me question if was just a door or window would it be able to be read as a room. Thought about placing a door handle on plastic sheet. I did however find this idea less possible logistically because of the weight of a door handle.

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Roni Horn, Installation view, Vatnasafn / Library of Water, Permanent installation since 2007 

Light in these

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Felix Gonzalez-Torres 

Sweets read like landscapes 

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Shiota

Try and Go Home of 1998, Shiota fasted for four days and then smeared her naked body with earth before taking to a muddy hole. With its suggestions of both womb and grave, the work hinged on feelings of loss and oblivion that have underscored much of her work since.

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Anti Illusion Exhibition book

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UNKNOWN

I was drawn to this piece because it reminded me of my favourite works by Robert Morris which are his felt pieces. This piece made me think about installing my work onto the walls, like hanging my mesh pieces.

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ROBERT MORRIS FELT PIECES

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Exhibition visit

http://www.foldgallery.com/artist/olivia-bax/

AMAZING AHHH!!!

Use of space, filled well. Large scale work created site specific - responding the the space eg. curved ceiling to curved orange motifs. Use of connectors idea that sculptures can be moved/impermenence. Although raw material, so could be massive etc, think scale worked better than would if massive. I found this especially with the orange 'zest' pieces Human size, looked like would fit perfectly inside. Scaffolding feel with large extended white structure, impossible to see all at once in small space which was intentional.

White rope work interested me because I was confused by it - usually wiggly things I find read quickly but these had a certain weight which was unexpected considering colour white (light) and thin (?!). Droopiness - slow heavy. Franz West PussStuke feel. Found of the white rope ones the long thin corner piece worked best with the space. The positioning, as if it was reflecting something off the ceiling, I could not help notice the similarities to the white lights of the gallery. 

Preferred the teal blue grates to the orange sculpture - seamed cleaner. Loved how close you could get to it. Roughness of the texture and bold colour choice - compliments the white/more blue than yellow undertones of the lights in the gallery. 

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OLIVIA BAX

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OLIVIA BAX

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LIGHT DISPLAY CANARY WHALF

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LIGHT DISPLAY CANARY WHALF

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EXHIBIITON

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